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Another Documented Spotting of Waterford's Big Cat

The Cross Road bobcat is quickly becoming the Waldo of Waterford.

The legend of the Cross Road bobcat grows.

On Sunday, Sept. 2 – the Sunday during Labor Day weekend – Teresa Wilensky, a friend and her family were sitting on Wilensky's back deck off of Melanie Drive, getting ready for a barbeque. And then there strolled what can only be referred to as the Cross Road bobcat, walking through Wilensky's yard.

“He was just walking around slowly, hunting, looking for his own dinner,” Wilensky said. “He was beautiful.”

Wilensky, whose children are now at least high school age and who doesn’t have any pets, said she isn’t scared about the bobcat at all. Instead, she said she now feels like “part of the in crowd,” as she is one of several people to see the bobcat off of Cross Road.

“If my kids were still little, I’d probably be nervous,” Wilensky said. “But they aren’t, and I don’t have any pets. So I think it is awesome, I think it is very cool.”

In February, about most likely the same bobcat after it was spotted and photographed by William Porter off of Springdale Road. Springdale Road is also off of Cross Road, and very close to Melanie Drive.

About bobcats

According to a fact sheet by the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, bobcat sightings should not cause any alarm. According to the DEEP, “bobcat attacks on people are virtually unknown,” although they do pose a small threat to livestock and domestic cats.

Bobcats are solitary animals – meaning most likely the bobcat the Wilenskys saw is the same bobcat Porter saw – that hunt alone in thick cover, according to the DEEP. They have outstanding hearing and vision, and hide patiently and then ambush their prey, according to the DEEP.

Bobcats target smaller animals like squirrels and rabbits, although they occasionally attack deer, according to the DEEP. It is illegal to kill a bobcat, and bobcats almost never spread disease to other animals or humans, according to the DEEP.

“Problems caused by bobcats are too infrequent to justify efforts to reduce populations,” the DEEP's website reads. “Conflicts should be addressed on an individual basis and can often be remedied by preventative methods such as fencing."

Elyse Landesberg September 11, 2012 at 11:17 AM
At a neighborhood party this past weekend, a neighbor also reported having seen a bobcat. The description matched the pictures above, but we are near Ridgewood, on Alewife Rd. Two bobcats? Or a wide territory?
Deborah Flaherty September 11, 2012 at 12:02 PM
There has also been one spotted over near Millstone....I think there are def. several in the area
Candy Heikkinen September 11, 2012 at 12:31 PM
My Mom might have seen one in our back yard (Gallup Lane) on Saturday night. But she said it went by so fast - it was hard to tell.
elaine lisitano September 11, 2012 at 01:12 PM
We had several sightings of multiple bobcats seen together on different days last winter on Millstone Road
Larry Lynch September 11, 2012 at 02:49 PM
If there were 4 or 5 Bobcats in Waterford, I would not be surprised at all. Its a pretty good sized area, and Bobcats dont always have a large home range. (where the hunting is good the range of one cat can be point one square mile (a tenth of a square mile).. The food supply is good for the Bobcats in NL, Waterford, Groton, and the surrounding area. Rabbits are as thick as fleas around here, with LOTS of stray feral cats to add to the diet of a Bobcat. The only thing I can think of that you need to do, to protect yourself from Bobcats is: Dont let your small dog or house-cat outside loose..
joan September 11, 2012 at 06:40 PM
Hi we saw one a few weeks back on Spithead Rd past Daniels Ave heading into the powerlines...
Edward Jones September 13, 2012 at 04:15 PM
Is it just the picture or does that Bobcat have a tail?
Paul Petrone (Editor) September 13, 2012 at 04:44 PM
It's actually the back leg, if you look at it closely. Bobcats don't have tails I'm told, if you look at it close you'll see it (I thought the same thing).
Larry Lynch September 15, 2012 at 04:58 PM
"Bobcats" do sometimes have tails up to 7 inches long (encyclopedia reference) but usually 3" is the normal length.. I have only ever seen one Bobcat that seemed to have no tail at all, and I've seen many, many Bobcats. On the other hand, I think that Mr. Petrone is correct about the photo.. Its probably the cats' back leg that looks like a tail in the photo, with the bottom of the leg, and the foot obscured by the grass.

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